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1912

The Children’s Home Society is founded in Meridian, Mississippi.

The Children’s Home Society is officially launched in a small office in Meridian, Mississippi, on January 12, 1912, with four children in need and ¢25 in cash. Over its first year of operation, the fledgling society serves 45 children.

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1913

The Children’s Society moves to Jackson with a new name.

The Children’s Society becomes Mississippi Children’s Home Society.

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1916

Dr. Richard V. Powers donates land use at 1801 North West Street.

He also provides $75,000 to build the Kate McWillie Powers Receiving Home for Children.

1926

Thomas Gale deeds 240 acres of land adjoining Jackson to the Society.

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1942

The Society’s charter is amended to extend services.

Services now include prenatal care for unwed mothers.

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1957

Crestview Maternity Home for unwed mothers established.

The only maternity home in Mississippi licensed by the Department of Public Welfare is approved by the Mississippi Medical Association.

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1975

Administration and services center facility built on North West Street.

The new facility is built on the site of the former Kate McWillie Powers Receiving Home.

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1981

Mother and Child Center Program begins.

The center provides specialized, residential care to high-risk single mothers with infants, partially funded by the Mississippi Department of Welfare.

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1983

Kate McWillie Powers Group Home for Adolescent Girls Opens.

The home contains eight beds for troubled girls.

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1984

Becomes accredited by Child Welfare League of America.

Mississippi Children’s Home Services becomes the only fully-accredited agency in the state to hold that distinction.

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1985

Opens the ARK residential treatment center.

MCHS receives funding from the MS Department of Mental Health to open the ARK (Addicted – Rehabilitated Kids) – a residential treatment center for chemically-dependent youth.

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1986

Merges with Family Service of Greater Jackson.

The agency expands its mission statement, “… to meet the needs of children and families, whatever those needs may be, through a comprehensive child and family welfare organization that provides quality professional services.”

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1987

The ARK adds an outpatient program for chemically-dependent youth and their families.

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1988

Receives the honor of “Best Managed Agency Award” from the United Way of the Capital Area.

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1993

CARES Center, Inc., a 20-bed child and adolescent psychiatric residential treatment facility, opens and is accredited.

CARES is accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations.

2001

The Elsie Meadows Hood Youth Development Center is dedicated on our CARES campus, in Jackson.

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2003

Purchases an 80-acre children’s campus and facilities on the Gulf Coast.

2005

Completes 14-bed children’s residential treatment facility unit, welcome center, and chapel at our CARES campus.

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2006

Receives donation from James and Jean Austin Bagley.

The donation is used to purchase 21 acres at North West Street and Woodrow Wilson and becomes the Jean Austin Bagley Campus.

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2007

Develops a regional, community-based, mental health service system.

The program is named Mississippi Youth Programs Around the Clock (MYPAC), and provides state-wide home and community-based mental health services.

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2008

Establishes five, school-based, mental health programs.

These programs are developed in response to Hurricane Katrina’s effect on children residing on the MS Gulf Coast and is funded by a grant through the American Red Cross.

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2009

Completes Phase 1 construction of Jim and Jean Austin Bagley Campus.

MCHS opens school day program in Hattiesburg. Receives Kresge Foundation grant to help fund cottages and school completion. Carol Biedenharn’s generous donation funds the completion of the W.L. Albriton Arts and Education Center on our Bagley Campus.

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2010

Begins providing only state-wide family preservation and family reunification services.

MCHS partners with MS Department of Human Services to begin to delivery of Mississippi’s only state-wide family preservation and family reunification services, the Comprehensive Family Support Services Program (CFSSP). Receives a grant from the Mississippi Development Authority to construct two, 10-bed group homes and a vocational/educational facility on our 80-acre Gulf Coast Campus.

2011

Launches the Mississippi Center for Behavioral Sciences in Jackson and Gulfport.

Funds from a BP Oil grant expand mental health services during disaster recovery on the Mississippi Gulf Coast and helps open Gulfport CARES School.

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2012

Administrative staff relocates to Lakeland Drive.

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2013

Receives Community Mental Health Center designation.

Receives grant from Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Mississippi Foundation to construct a fitness trail on Bagley Campus.

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2014

Develops an Early Intervention pilot for Autism

Upon receiving a grant from the Mississippi Division of Medicaid to develop an early intervention autism pilot, MCHS joins in collaboration with University of Mississippi Medical Center to integrate primary and behavioral health as well as provide telehealth behavioral health services to families and children statewide.

They enter into a management agreement with the Child Abuse Prevention Center, host Mississippi’s first Children’s Mental Health Summit, and receive a $1 million donation from Gertrude C. Ford Foundation for Autism services.

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2015

CARES Center Gulf Coast opens

MCHS opens a 20-bed psychiatric residential treatment center in Saucier, Mississippi.

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2016

MCHS becomes Canopy Children’s Solutions

Canopy’s new name drives clarity of what solutions we offer through the agency. It also creates an identity that is memorable, unmistakable, and easily understood by the children and families we serve and those who support our crucial work.